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Podcast Anthropology Terbaik yang Dapat Kami Temukan
Podcast Anthropology Terbaik yang Dapat Kami Temukan
Podcast Antropologi ini mencakup segala hal mulai dari geologi, keanekaragaman hayati, pengetahuan luar biasa tentang manusia, budaya, sejarah, potensi umat manusia, dan banyak lagi ⁠ — jadi jelajahi podcast ini di waktu senggang Anda dan Anda tidak akan kecewa!
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Stupid Anthropology has birthed from the ashes of The Right Can’t Read. We have leapt from the desiccated skull like a weird zombie Athena to sometimes ask stupid questions, sometimes our stupid ideas, sometimes our stupid screaming into the void. Join Aaron, Robert, and Jonny as we explore whatever diseased questions pop into our collapsing brains. Questions such as: What’s the deal with selling out? Who are the worst people that came on Oprah’s show? What’s the deal with airline food?
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Anthropology on Air

Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen

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Anthropology on Air is a podcast brought to you by the Social Anthropology department at the University of Bergen in Norway. Each season, we bring you conversations with inspiring thinkers from the anthropology world and beyond. The music in the podcast is made by Victor Lange, and the episodes are produced by Sadie Hale and Sidsel Marie Henriksen. You can follow us on Facebook. Visit uib.no/antro, where you can find more information on the ongoing work and upcoming events at the department.
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Real life lectures recorded from a college classroom, on the topic of Physical Anthropology. It introduces primates, biology, evolution, fossils, dentition, and much more - relating to monkeys, primates and humans.
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The Anthropology in Business podcast is for anthropologists and business leaders interested in learning more about the many ways anthropology is applied in business and why business anthropology is one of the most effective lenses for making sense of organizations and consumers. It is hosted by Matt Artz, a business anthropologist specializing in design anthropology and working at the intersection of product management, user experience, and business strategy. To learn more about the Anthropo ...
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SAGE Anthropology & Archaeology

SAGE Publications Ltd.

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Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE Publications for Anthropology & Archaeology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
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Conversations in Anthropology

Conversations in Anthropology

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A podcast about life, the universe and anthropology produced by David Boarder Giles, Timothy Neale, Cameo Dalley, Mythily Meher and Matt Barlow. Each episode features an anthropologist or two in conversation, discussing anthropology and what it has to tell us in the twenty-first century. This podcast is made in partnership with the American Anthropological Association and with support from the Faculty of Arts & Education at Deakin University.
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Nutrition Anthropology Podcast

Annette Adams, MDA, RDN, LD/N

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Has one-size-fits-all nutrition advice let you down? Join registered dietitian nutritionist, Annette Adams, as she shares a new approach to health and well-being that honors you as the expert of you. Nutrition Anthropology podcast discusses social customs, beliefs, and norms regarding nutrition through a weight neutral lens. We tackle human behavior – past and present – as it relates to food and well-being. Our mission is to provide a safe space for every body to create a positive relationsh ...
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The Innovation in Digital Anthropology podcast is brought to you by the LiiV Center and Matt Artz. The LiiV Center is a nonprofit advancing how the world understands people in the digital age. The team at the Liiv Center, in partnership with UNESCO, is working to advance education, technology, and awareness for innovation in digital anthropology as a force for good across the public and private sectors. To help accomplish that goal, we have created this podcast, in which we will explore the ...
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The Anthropology, AI, and the Future of Human Society podcast mini-series was created in anticipation of the upcoming Anthropology, AI, and the Future of Human Society Virtual Conference. It is being organized by the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland and runs from June 6-10th, 2022. The podcast was created as a partnership between the Royal Anthropological Institute and Matt Artz.
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Immanuel Kant gave a series of lectures on anthropology 1772-1773, 1795-1796 at the University of Königsberg, which was founded in 1544. His lectures dealt with recognizing the internal and external in man, cognition, sensuousness, the five senses, as well as the soul and the mind. They were gathered together and published in 1798 and then published in English in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1867, volumes 9-16. Therefore, several texts will be used for this book. I was able to fi ...
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Tazin Abdullah speaks with Dr Ibrar Bhatt about heritage literacies, particularly as they are practiced by Chinese Muslims. Bhatt is the author of A Semiotics of Muslimness in China (Cambridge UP, 2023). About the book: A Semiotics of Muslimness in China examines the semiotics of Sino-Muslim heritage literacy in a way that integrates its Perso-Arab…
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In this podcast episode, Professor Burlingame discusses some of the ways that the indigenous peoples of the Americas seasoned their foods before 1492. This is an ethnobotanical and medical anthropology discussion of this topic that is for anyone looking to be inspired to deepen their understanding of humanity. (13 minutes and 52 seconds) Support th…
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In this episode, the finale to season 3, we speak with Atreyee Sen, Associate Professor at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Copenhagen. Our topic of discussion is a talk Atreyee gave at our department entitled, ‘No city for lovers: Urban poverty, public romance and violent moral policing of lower-class female youth in Mumbai’, wh…
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A recent study1 has provided new insights into the mysterious population collapse that occurred in Northern Europe over 5,000 years ago. This event, known as the Scandinavian "Neolithic decline," saw the abandonment of large settlements and the cessation of megalith construction. Traditionally, this decline was attributed to agricultural crises, bu…
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What do universal rights to public goods like education mean when codified as individual, private choices? Is the “problem” of school choice actually not about better choices for all but, rather, about the competition and exclusion that choice engenders—guaranteeing a system of winners and losers? Unsettling Choice: Race, Rights, and the Partitioni…
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For some four hundred years, Hindus and Christians have been engaged in a public controversy about conversion and missionary proselytization, especially in India and the Hindu diaspora. Hindu Mission, Christian Mission: Soundings in Comparative Theology (SUNY Press, 2024) reframes this controversy by shifting attention from "conversion" to a wider,…
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The 'baby boom' generation, born between the 1940s and the 1960s, is often credited with pioneering new and creative ways of relating, doing intimacy and making families. With this cohort now entering mid and later life in Britain, they are also said to be revolutionising the experience of ageing. Are the romantic practices of this 'revolutionary c…
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Archaeologists in Peru have made a groundbreaking discovery1: the remains of a 4,000-year-old temple and theater. This finding promises to significantly enhance our understanding of ancient religious practices and social structures in the Andes. Field Museum scientist Luis Muro Ynoñán with the carving of a mythological bird creature in La Otra Band…
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Imagine that you volunteer for the clinical trial of an experimental drug. The only direct benefit of participating is that you will receive up to $5,175. You must spend twenty nights literally locked in a research facility. You will be told what to eat, when to eat, and when to sleep. You will share a bedroom with several strangers. Who are you, a…
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Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel talks with Paula Bialski, an Associate Professor for Digital Sociology at the University of St. Gallen in St. Gallen, Switzerland, about her recent book, Middle Tech: Software Work and the Culture of Good Enough (Princeton UP, 2024). The pair talk about the art of ethnographic study of software work, and how, maybe,…
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Israeli universities have long enjoyed a reputation as liberal bastions of freedom and democracy. Drawing on extensive research and making Hebrew sources accessible to the international community, Maya Wind shatters this myth by documenting how Israeli universities are directly complicit in the violation of Palestinian rights. In Towers of Ivory an…
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In Dance Music Spaces: Clubs, Clubbers, and DJs Navigating Authenticity, Branding, and Commercialism (Lexington Books, 2022), Danielle Antoinette Hidalgo examines the production of physical and digital spaces in dance music, and how the players—clubs, clubbers, and DJs—use authenticity, branding, and commercialism to navigate them. An in-depth stud…
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Each year, hundreds of thousands of migrants are moved through immigration court. With a national backlog surpassing one million cases, court hearings take years and most migrants will eventually be ordered deported. The Slow Violence of Immigration Court: Procedural Justice on Trial (NYU Press, 2023) by Dr. Maya Pagni Barak sheds light on the expe…
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In Model Cases: On Canonical Research Objects and Sites (University of Chicago Press, 2021), Dr. Monika Krause asks about the concrete material research objects behind shared conversations about classes of objects, periods, and regions in the social sciences and humanities. It is well known that biologists focus on particular organisms, such as mic…
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Based on over a decade of research, a powerful, moving work of narrative nonfiction that illuminates the little-known world of the anexos of Mexico City, the informal addiction treatment centers where mothers send their children to escape the violence of the drug war. The Way That Leads Among the Lost: Life, Death, and Hope in Mexico City's Anexos …
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The COVID-19 pandemic left millions grieving their loved ones without the consolation of traditional ways of mourning. Patients were admitted to hospitals and never seen again. Social distancing often meant conventional funerals could not be held. Religious communities of all kinds were disrupted at the exact moment mourners turned to them for supp…
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Despite a mass expansion of the higher education sector in the UK since the 1960s, young people from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds remain less likely to enter university than their advantaged counterparts. Drawing on unique new research gathered from three contrasting secondary schools in England, including interviews with children f…
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Around the turn of the millennium, Pentecostal churches began to pepper majority-Buddhist Sri Lanka, setting off a sense of alarm among Buddhists who saw Christianity as a neocolonial threat to the nation. Rumors of foul play in the death of a Buddhist monk, as well as allegations of proselytizing in the aftermath of the 2004 tsunami and during the…
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A prehistoric painting in Indonesia has been dated to at least 51,200 years ago, making it the earliest known example of "figurative" cave art in the world. This discovery may also represent the oldest known surviving example of a narrative scene, as proposed by a team of researchers in a recent study. Figurative artworks are those that clearly dep…
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Half a century ago, deindustrialization gutted blue-collar jobs in the American Midwest. But today, these places are not ghost towns. People still call these communities home, even as they struggle with unemployment, poverty, and other social and economic crises. Why do people remain in declining areas through difficult circumstances? What do their…
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The latest developments in robotics and artificial intelligence and a preview of the coming decades, based on research and interviews with the world's foremost experts. If there’s one universal trait among humans, it’s our social nature. The craving to connect is universal, compelling, and frequently irresistible. This concept is central to Robots …
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Modern humans carry a surprising legacy from our ancient cousins, the extinct Neanderthals. A new study1 suggests that archaic genes, inherited through interbreeding tens of thousands of years ago, may influence our susceptibility to autism. The Genetic Legacy of Interbreeding Neanderthals, a distinct species from modern humans, interbred with earl…
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A hole in a bone awl must have been one of the great drivers of human expansion in its beginnings. For hundreds of thousands of years, early hominid species did not need much shelter; the climate in most of Africa made it unnecessary. However, as they expanded further north, the fossil record shows how they became sheltered. No clothing has been pr…
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Previously ranked among the hemisphere’s poorest countries, Guyana is becoming a global leader in per capita oil production, a shift which promises to profoundly transform the nation. This sea change presents a unique opportunity to dissect both the environmental impacts of modern-world resource extraction and the obscured yet damaging ways in whic…
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Introduction A remarkable discovery in southeastern Australia has unveiled archaeological evidence of what may be the oldest known culturally transmitted human ritual. Sticks found preserved in fireplaces within a cave, dating back to the end of the Last Ice Age, suggest that a ritual intended to cure or harm has been passed down through approximat…
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Stringers and the Journalistic Field: Marginalities and Precarious News Labour in Small-Town India (Routledge, 2023) is one of the first ethnographic works on small-town stringers or informal news workers in Indian journalism. It explores existing practices and cultures in the field of local journalism and the roles and spaces stringers occupy. The…
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Balihar Sanghera and Elmira Satybaldieva’s Rentier Capitalism and Its Discontents: Power, Morality and Resistance in Central Asia (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021) evaluates today’s economic political, social and ecological crises through the lens of rentier capitalism and countermovements in Central Asia. Over the last three decades, the rich and powerfu…
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We live in a historical conjuncture characterized by the rise of a range of social movements that aim to challenge different forms of domination: capitalism, patriarchy, racism, settler colonialism, just to name a few. However, critical scholars remain divided about how to think about the relations between these different struggles. The political s…
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In Professor Zeitlyn's words, anthropology “has had enough of the big ideas already” -especially theories with a big ‘T’. In a discipline that seems to be constantly beset by ‘turns’, or agonising over its status and ‘commensurability’ across cultural differences, Professor Zeitlyn in his latest book An Anthropological Toolkit: Sixty Useful Concept…
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