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Native Opinion is a unique Indigenous culture education Radio show & podcast from an American Indian perspective on current affairs. The Hosts of this show are Michael Kickingbear, an enrolled member of the Mashantucket Pequot tribal nation of Connecticut and David GreyOwl, of the Echoda Eastern Band of Cherokee nation of Alabama. Together they present Indigenous views on American history, politics, the environment, and culture. This show is open to all people, and its main focus is to provi ...
 
Wisdom is the next step in gaining knowledge. And with that, the Native Learning Center has created the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast. Hoporenkv (Hopo-thlee-in-ka) is the Creek word for “wisdom”. Hoporenkv Native American Podcast is the all new audio podcast venture from the NLC to provide short and focused information on various topics and subject matter related to NAHASDA in shorter formats than our typical weekly webinars. Make sure to visit the NLC website to learn more about the upc ...
 
The Native American Flute Music podcast is hosted by Bill Webb. Bill Webb is a composer, performer and singer of original music featuring Native American flute and world instruments. The Native American Flute Podcast includes music from dozens of his published albums from the first release, 'Native American Flute' in 2003 to 'Medicine' released in 2017. New albums will be played on the weekly podcasts as they are released along with the many previous albums. Native American Flute guest artis ...
 
History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
 
This podcast was developed as part of an elementary-level Clark County School District Teaching American History Grant. The three-year grant will fund six modules per year with each module focusing on a different era of American history and a different pedagogical theme. This podcast focuses on Native Americans of the Colonial Era and Technology Integration in Elementary Schools. Participants in the grant are third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers in Clark County (the greater Las Vegas area ...
 
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show series
 
Greg Marchildon interviews Benjamin Hoy, author of A Line of Blood and Dirt: Creating the Canada-United States Border across Indigenous Lands (Oxford UP, 2021). Hoy’s book is a history of the infrastructure, policies, and personnel that were put in place over the past three centuries to create a boundary between the United States and British North …
 
There has been an old belief among many voters for decades, generations, that old white men know what’s best for the nation and are the best choices to keep them in public office as lawmakers. That old myth could not be more wrong, and the myth needs to die.Oleh Native Opinion Incorporated
 
Greg Marchildon interviews historian and ethnographer Jennifer Brown on her two most recent books. The first, Ojibwe Stories from the Upper Berens River: A Irving Hallowell and Adam Bigmouth in Conversation (U of Nebraska Press, 2018) concerns the interactions of American anthropologist A. Irving Hallowell with the Berens River band on the east sid…
 
President Abraham Lincoln ordered the largest mass execution of Indigenous people in American history, following the 1862 uprising of hungry Dakota in Minnesota and suspiciously speedy trials. He also issued the largest commutation of executions in American history for the same act. But there is much more to the story of Lincoln’s interactions and …
 
Today I talked to Dr. Mohamed Adhikari about his book Destroying to Replace: Settler Genocides of Indigenous Peoples (Hackett, 2022). "This book explores settler colonial genocides in a global perspective and over the long durée. It does so systematically and compellingly, as it investigates how settler colonial expansion at times created condition…
 
A violent ex-con forces his son to commit crimes in this unforgettable memoir about family and survival. Growing up on the Navajo Indian Reservation, David Crow and his three siblings idolized their dad, a self-taught Cherokee who loved to tell his children about his World War II feats. But as time passed, David discovered the other side of Thursto…
 
Many scholars assert that Mexico’s complex racial hierarchy, inherited from Spanish colonialism, became obsolete by the turn of the nineteenth century as class-based distinctions became more prominent and a largely mestizo population emerged. But the residues of the colonial caste system did not simply dissolve after Mexico gained independence. Rat…
 
The destruction of flora and fauna because of the lack of concern for the planet cannot be calculated at this point. Because of the quest for as much money that can be made at the expense of Mother Earth, many indigenous peoples are experiencing the damages first-hand. Threats to livelihoods and homes have left many asking the question; is it too l…
 
President Rafael Correa (2007-2017) led the Ecuadoran Citizens’ Revolution that claimed to challenge the tenets of neoliberalism and the legacies of colonialism. The Correa administration promised to advance Indigenous and Afro-descendant rights and redistribute resources to the most vulnerable. In many cases, these promises proved to be hollow. Us…
 
Expo 1967 was the centrepiece of Canada’s 100th birthday. Amid the crowds and the pageantry, one building stood out: The Indians of Canada Pavilion. This was more than a tall glass tipi. It revealed (at least partly) Canada's sordid colonial history, and it challenged the myth of Canada being a peace-loving and tolerant society. We tell the surpris…
 
This is part 2 of a 2-part series from Cited - the predecessor of Darts and Letters. For the final episode of our “Activism & Academia”-themed week of programming, we’re returning to Cited’s series on genetically modified corn, Indigenous rights, and environmental law in Mexico. Return with us to our story on how the discovery of genetically modifi…
 
This is part 1 of a 2-part series from Cited - the predecessor of Darts and Letters. When genetically modified corn was found in the highlands of Mexico, Indigenous campesino groups took to the streets to protect their cultural heritage, setting off a 20-year legal saga. The battle brought Indigenous rights, scientific methods, academic freedom, an…
 
In many ways, Black Elk and John Neihardt lived very different lives. Black Elk was an Oglala Lakota holy man. Neihartd was a European-American literary critic. Black Elk performed for Queen Victoria with Buffalo Bills’s Wild West Show. Neihartd was Poet Laureate of Nebraska. But in other ways, they weren’t different at all. “By all accounts, they …
 
WARNING! THIS EPISODE IS NOT SAFE FOR WORK OR SMALL CHILDREN! In this episode of Native Opinion, we provide our deconstruction of Pope Francis visit to Cree territory in Canada, and the apology he provided to the victims of residential schools under the direction of the Catholic Church and the Canadian federal government. Was his apology enough? Ho…
 
Against long odds, the Anishinaabeg resisted removal, retaining much of their land in the Old Northwest—what’s now Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Their success rested partly on their roles as sellers of natural resources and buyers of trade goods, which made them key players in the political economy of plunder that drove white settlement and U…
 
M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose bi…
 
The term cacica was a Spanish linguistic invention, the female counterpart to caciques, the Arawak word for male indigenous leaders in Spanish America. But the term’s meaning was adapted and manipulated by natives, creating a new social stratum where it previously may not have existed. This book explores that transformation, a conscious constructio…
 
Understanding and explaining societal rules surrounding food and foodways have been the foci of anthropological studies since the early days of the discipline. Baking, Bourbon, and Black Drink: Foodways Archaeology in the American Southeast (U Alabama Press, 2018), however, is the first collection devoted exclusively to southeastern foodways analyz…
 
Over the course of more than three centuries, the diverse communities of Louisiana have engaged in creative living practices to forge a vibrant, multifaceted, and fully developed Creole culture. Against the backdrop of ongoing anti-Blackness and Indigenous erasure that has sought to undermine this rich culture, Louisiana Creoles have found transfor…
 
Conversations with LeAnne Howe (UP of Mississippi, 2022) is the first collection of interviews with the groundbreaking Choctaw author, whose genre-bending works take place in the US Southeast, Oklahoma, and beyond our national borders to bring Native American characters and themes to the global stage. Best known for her American Book Award-winning …
 
Climate Change causes droughts, with lake levels at an all-time low. In the United States, water is called a "resource," no different than some other capitalistic commodity. In this episode, we look at the challenges water faces, and what the effects of climate change are doing to it. We also discuss the misunderstood term "sustainability." We ask …
 
Navigating the political atmosphere at the national level right now with so many important issues that need to be addressed. In this episode, we focus on two. Saving lives and saving democracy. Both require levels of leadership that are questionable if it actually exists in Washington DC. The need for severe change is real, with decisions that requ…
 
To many Americans in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the West was simultaneously the greatest symbol of American opportunity, the greatest story of its history, and the imagined blank slate on which the country's future would be written. From the Spanish-American War in 1898 to the Great Depression's end, from the Mississippi to the Pacific…
 
The attempts, the successes, the lies, and the coverups. We are still here despite their attempts. In our main segment, we have a very serious discussion about gun violence in the United States. Who has failed the children and teachers who are the innocent victims? Who Is responsible? The Gun Manufacturers? Or the politicians who fail to implement …
 
For centuries Comanches have captivated imaginations. Yet their story in popular accounts abruptly stops in 1875, when the last free Comanches entered a reservation in southwestern Oklahoma. In Cinematic Comanches: The Lone Ranger in the Media Borderlands (U Nebraska Press, 2022), the first tribal-specific history of Comanches in film and media, Qu…
 
America calls it a "Natural Resource”, but water is more than that. Much more. Yet the need and desire of state and federal governments to control access is often a detriment to indigenous People. Is this episode we examine some of these problems. We look at how the effects of man-made climate change is depleting available water, and why water righ…
 
Brotherhood to Nationhood: George Manuel and the Making of the Modern Indian Movement (Between the Lines Books, 2020) details the life of George Manuel, a seminal figure in the emergence and development of the modern Indigenous rights movement in Canada. A three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, he laid the groundwork for what would become the Assemb…
 
The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly an…
 
In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh leg…
 
It is still all about the numbers. The push to stop legal abortion is all about preserving and securing a hold on the ideology of white supremacy. If one was to drill down and see what the push has been in the past it is all about preserving white majorities.Oleh Native Opinion Incorporated
 
No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries a…
 
There has always been a pervasive greed and hatred toward Natives and other peoples of color in this country. The desire to not be inclusive is a part of the everyday behaviors of State and local governments. When it comes to the overall inequality people of color face in this country, the phrase; ”Let them eat grass.” comes to mind.…
 
Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeolog…
 
In The Apache Diaspora: Four Centuries of Displacement and Survival (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Paul Conrad brings to life the stories of displaced Apaches and the kin from whom they were separated. Conrad uses the lens of “diaspora” to analyze four centuries of Ndé/Apache history, from their initial interactions with Europeans in the sixteenth c…
 
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