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Catch up with any event you have missed. The public event podcast series from UCL Political Science brings together the impressive range of policy makers, leading thinkers, practitioners, and academics who speak at our events. Further information about upcoming events can be found via our website: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/political-science/political-science
 
A podcast with School of Public Policy and UCL academics alongside practitioners who will discuss the politics and policy of Covid-19. The format of the podcast will include short presentations from each speaker, with most of the time dedicated to discussion and debate. Listeners will have the option to pre-submit questions to our panel using the links on our website and each podcast will be available to listen to on all major platforms at any time following release.
 
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show series
 
In this seminar four senior political correspondents reflect on what journalism was like at the start of their careers; how it has changed during their lifetimes; and how that has changed the way the press reports on politics, and the way politicians respond. Trevor Kavanagh was for many years Political Editor of The Sun, Catherine MacLeod was Poli…
 
Rory Stewart has been a diplomat, soldier, explorer, politician, and is now an academic at Yale. In 2003 he became deputy governor in two remote provinces of Iraq, recorded in his book Prince of the Marshes. In 2005 he moved to Kabul to establish an NGO, the Turquoise Mountain Foundation. From 2010 to 2019 he was an MP, becoming chair of the Defenc…
 
The Covid pandemic has exacerbated many existing inequalities and introduced new ones. There could hardly be a more pressing time to understand how inequalities arise, which ones matter, why, and how they should be addressed. Professor Sir Richard Blundell (UCL), Research Director at IFS and PI for the Deaton Review: Inequalities in the 21st Centur…
 
Official statistics and evidence have been central in ensuring that the government has the best possible data, not just on infections and deaths, but on social behaviour, the impact on the economy, etc. As chair of the UK Statistics Authority, Sir David Norgrove is responsible for safeguarding the production and publication of official statistics: …
 
This seminar presents – and vigorously critiques – a new edited volume, “American Political Economy”, which aims to reorient our understanding of US politics. Democratic erosions and economic inequalities, two of the most pressing political problems of the United States and its rich western peers, can only be understood in light of the economic, ge…
 
In this seminar Michael Jacobs will explain the main issues to be discussed at the Summit, the key players, and likely outcomes. He will place COP26 in the wider context of multilateral cooperation and the domestic politics of acting on climate change. Michael was climate adviser to Gordon Brown when he was Prime Minister and was heavily involved i…
 
The covid-19 pandemic has been a severe test for the European Union as well as for its member-states: a test in which European cooperation has often been found wanting, in particular when it came to its vaccine programme. But this test has also led to a deepening of European solidarity, manifested most prominently in the European recovery fund. Wha…
 
Less than two months into his term, President Joe Biden is signing his first major piece of legislation, a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. What are his other domestic priorities, and who are the leading figures in his administration to deliver them? What obstacles does he face in Congress and elsewhere, and can he overcome them? To discus…
 
Nick Herbert is a former Minister, and the founder of GovernUp. Last summer he launched the Commission for Smart Government, to tackle the systemic problems of government in the UK: departmental silos, a muddled centre exercising weak financial management, unaccountable agencies, inability to learn from mistakes. In this seminar he is joined by Sir…
 
The British media tend to report on Brexit only from the British point of view. In this seminar we redress the balance by inviting four foreign correspondents based in London to talk about how Brexit has been viewed from France, Germany, Italy and Poland. What conclusions have leading European countries drawn from the whole Brexit process; and wher…
 
Deirdre Hutton has experienced all those spheres of regulation, and more, having just stepped down from ten years as chair of the Civil Aviation Authority. In this seminar she is joined by Professor Cary Coglianese, director of the Penn Program on Regulation, and Walter Merricks, former Chief Ombudsman of the Financial Ombudsman Service. Together t…
 
In this seminar he is joined by Ciaran Martin, Chief Executive of the National Cyber Security Centre 2016-2020, to discuss spycraft, how raw intelligence is analysed, and how intelligence officers then use that information – often contradictory or incomplete – to build the most accurate possible image of the world. The ways of thinking used in inte…
 
China regards the island of Taiwan as a breakaway province; Taiwan’s leaders say it is an independent state. As China rises to superpower status, it has shown greater interest in reclaiming territory long regarded as its own, in the South China Sea, along the Himalayan border – and in Taiwan. The growing tensions could drag the US into the fray. To…
 
John Micklethwait is editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News, and Adrian Wooldridge is political editor of the Economist, and author of their Bagehot column. In their latest book they analyse the disastrous failure of many western countries to control the Coronavirus, and what it exposes about the weaknesses of their systems of government. It is a wake u…
 
Government interventions in response to Covid-19 make clear that the state can act as an extremely powerful guarantor of economic and health security. But has the crisis, and the subsequent governmental response, shifted voters' attitudes about the role that the government should play in society more generally? In a recent study, Tim Hicks, Tom O’G…
 
Jack Straw was Foreign Secretary in the Blair government from 2001 to 2006. His five years at the Foreign Office saw him grappling with every conflict zone from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, the accession of ten new states to the EU, the failed accession bid from Turkey, the bombing of the Twin Towers on 9/11, and the Allied invasion of Iraq, led by the…
 
To discuss these worldwide trends, how to counter them, and how worried we should be about a populist rise in the UK, we are joined by three international experts: Anne Applebaum, author of Twilight of Democracy: The Failure of Politics and the Parting of Friends Rory Stewart, former Cabinet Minister and 2019 candidate for the Conservative Party le…
 
Last summer, we saw a statue of Bristol slave trader, Edward Colston, thrown in the harbour by Black Lives Matters protesters. Other statues of racist, colonial or controversial figures have also been taken down or been the sites of protests and University and other buildings have been renamed. A conversation has started to take place about how we …
 
Speakers: Lorriann Robinson is the founder and Director of The Advocacy Team, a consultancy practice providing policy, advocacy & campaigning services to international organisations. She is the co-founding partner of and advocacy lead for The Equity Index. Alex Martins is an independent researcher, facilitator and advocate passionate about creating…
 
With the dust finally settling on one of the highest stakes US elections in recent memory, pollsters, pundits, academics, and policymakers are looking to make sense of what happened. What are the key take-aways from the 2020 US elections? Why did the results turn out as they did? What are the main policy implications of the elections, and how will …
 
The words the future of conflict triggers shiny images of technology overtaking the battlefield and an extreme revolution in military affairs. But how real is the hype about the disruption to defence and what will this mean for the soldier on the ground? In this panel we bring together three experts to consider the real face of the future of confli…
 
Speakers: Brian Klaas is a political scientist at UCL and a weekly columnist for the Washington Post. He has written three books: The Despot's Accomplice (Oxford University Press), The Despot's Apprentice (Hurst & Co), and How to Rig an Election (Yale University Press). His research focuses on democracy, authoritarianism, Trumpism, the nature of po…
 
To discuss this we have four experts who have all been involved in writing and thinking about this: Prof Jonathan Boston from New Zealand had a Fulbright Fellowship to do comparative research on Governing for the Future; Jaakko Kuosmanen (Finnish Academy) is an expert on the human rights of future generations, and member of the Finnish Government’s…
 
Vernon Bogdanor Research Professor at King's College, London, Gresham Professor of Law, and Fellow of the British Academy Agata Gostyńska-Jakubowska, Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for European Reform Baroness (Julie) Smith, Reader in European Politics at Cambridge University Chair: Professor Robert Hazell…
 
In July the Intelligence and Security Committee published its long awaited Russia report.To introduce the report, and explain the difficulties which delayed its publication, our first speaker is Dominic Grieve, former Attorney General and chair of the committee when the report was compiled. Then to discuss the threat posed by Russia, and how the We…
 
Speakers: Professor Meg Russell, Professor of British and Comparative Politics and Director of the Constitution Unit Dr Thomas Gift, Lecturer in Political Science: Public Policy Economics and Analysis Dr Nils Metternich, Associate Professor in International Relations Chair: Professor Jennifer Hudson, Professor of Political Behaviour and Head of Pol…
 
In this podcast, four experts from the UCL Department of Political Science/School of Public Policy treat these issues and examine the hard questions facing the world as we look towards the end of lockdown. Speakers: Professor Kristin Bakke, Professor of Political Science and International Relations Dr Melanie Garson, Senior Teaching Fellow in Confl…
 
This episode will examine that question through a variety of political theory perspectives. Is it useful to think of a trade-off between individual liberty and collective security? Is it helpful to assess responses to the current crisis through the analogy of war? It will also look at the impact of the response to Covid-19 on particular groups, inc…
 
Speakers: Professor Wendy Carlin, Professor of Economics Dr Gabriella Conti, Associate Professor of Health Economics Professor Claudio Radaelli, Professor of Public Policy Dr Mike Seiferling, Lecturer in Public Finance Chair: Professor Jennifer Hudson, Professor of Political Behaviour and Head of Political Science Department…
 
Brexit has shaken British politics and raised important questions about how our democracy functions.Philip Rycroft, who was the lead civil servant on constitutional issues within the UK Government from 2012 to 2019, will examine how much Brexit has stressed the democratic process. He will look at trust in the institutions of the state and the state…
 
If victors write history, and Bashar al-Assad is consolidating his grip on Syria after nearly a decade of civil war, is there any hope of justice for victims of state-sponsored abuse in Syria?Russia and China have blocked efforts to set up an international tribunal for Syria, so Syrians in exile have been searching for ways to use national laws, an…
 
Conservative experts Lord Dunlop and Chris White speak at The Constitution Unit's first seminar of 2020.The Conservatives’ 2019 manifesto commits the new government ‘to look at the broader aspects of our constitution: the relationship between the government, parliament and the courts; the functioning of the Royal Prerogative; the role of the House …
 
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