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The United States of Anxiety is a show about the unfinished business of our history, and its grip on our future. Each week, host Kai Wright invites listeners to gather for intimate conversations and deeply reported stories about the choices we’ve made as a society -- and the new choices we can imagine now. We’re learning from our past, meeting our neighbors, and sharing the joy (and the work!) of living in a plural society. Our inbox is also open for your voice memos—send them to anxiety@wny ...
 
Welcome to the dark lord Reapers United States of Anarchy podcast where where no topic is off-limits and we give the Unapologetic truth you will also be discussing up-and-coming artist local artists local up-and-coming Brands and businesses that deserve your patronage and the attention of the mainstream Society race religion and politics will also be discussed if you are easily offended or have a narrow-minded point of view please do not listen!! And while you're at it boycott my social medi ...
 
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The United States Civil Rights Trail

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The United States Civil Rights Trail

The U.S. Civil Rights Trail, The United States Civil Rights Trail

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The U.S. Civil Rights Trail podcast is a narrative podcast series where historians and experts explore some of the most significant events of the Civil Rights movement. It features the real stories of real people who were there and who made a difference. And it explains why what took place then is still so relevant to all of us today.
 
A supplemental podcast for the website USvTsarnaev.org, dedicated to discussing the Boston Marathon bombing and the court case United States v. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Frequent topics are developments in Dzhokhar's appeal, new findings on our independent investigation into the case, legal opinions from an in-house defense attorney, and more.
 
What happens when college public radio becomes unhinged? Join Professor Gordon Pringle of La Brea Community College ("Where The Tar Meets The Sidewalk"), for These United States Stories, as he interviews a man who lives in a whale, a consumer advocate for watchers of online porn, the proprietor of a family billy club business and other craftsmen, crackpots and characters from around the country. A new interview each week, painting a picture of the USA, one disturbing story at a time.
 
Did you ever wish you could go back to class and learn about the most interesting, important, and impactful events in US history all over again...this time without the homework? If so, join the club! In this podcast, join Chris Caldwell and his fellow history nerds as they re-examine United States history one lesson at a time. Enjoy the podcast, and hopefully now you can take pride in knowing just a little bit more about the history of the United States.
 
Immigration Consultant Mitchell Saum discusses Employment-Based visas, green cards, and general immigration to the United States.**Disclaimer: This content does not constitute legal advice and does not establish an attorney-client relationship. I am not an immigration attorney and if you are seeking legal advice, please contact a licensed immigration attorney.
 
Throughout the years the Supreme Court has evolved much like the rest of the federal government. This would not be without landmark rulings, which will be the main focus of this podcast. Landmark rulings lay the groundwork for laws to be overturned or upheld and allow for the United States to work toward major goals.
 
Poignant and candid stories that explore what it means to experience race in America - from our earliest childhood memories to our current day social and political beliefs. Some heartbreaking, some cringe-worthy, some uplifting – all very personal. By sharing the stories of when we first learned we are all different, we find the common thread that shows us how much we’re all the same. Follow #unitedstatesofrace for more content at instagram.com/unitedstatesofrace and medium.com/united-states ...
 
In 1880, the New York Times reported a curious story from St. Albans, Vermont, about a mysterious figure, an attorney and Democratic operative named A. P. Hinman. Hinman privately told local Democratic leaders that he had been hired by the Democratic National Committee to obtain evidence that Vice-President-elect Chester A. Arthur was not qualified to hold the office of Vice President, but rather that Arthur was a Canadian-born alien. President Garfield was assassinated in 1881 and Arthur be ...
 
The National Sewer Agency is spying on people's toilets, looking for food terrorists... Food Enforcement Agent Jason Frolick believes in America. He believes in eating air. He struggles to get the food monkey off his back. As part of the Global War on Fat, his job is to put food terrorists in Fat Camp. When a pizza dealer gets whacked in the park across the street from the Thin House, the Prophet Jones himself asks Frolick to investigate. For the first time ever, Frolick solves a murder--but ...
 
Henry Wirz (November 25, 1823 – November 10, 1865) was the only Confederate soldier tried after the end of the American Civi War. He was tried, convicted, and executed, not for being a Confederate soldier, but for conspiracy and murder relating to his command of Camp Sumter, the infamous Confederate prisoner-of-war prison at Andersonville, Georgia. Wirz encouraged and commanded barbaric and murderous policies and actions in the prison. This Librivox recording is excerpts from the 850 page su ...
 
Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. It was ratified by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776.
 
Vol. I: The Colonial Period. Charles Austin Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first Greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interes ...
 
The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn’t long before the need for ...
 
Charles Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interests lay in feminism and the labor uni ...
 
American history is more than a collection of interesting stories, so why is it most often presented as such? It matters why things happened in the order they did. Join social historian Dr. Heath Mitton as he unpacks the story of the American Republic with special attention to how social and economic factors drove the politics of ideas, from the American Revolution through the presidency of Barack Obama. These episodes originally aired as a regular segment on 610 KVNU's For The People radio ...
 
First published in 1908, A Short History of The United States by Edward Channing aims to provide a compact and concise account of the events that went into the making of the United States of America. Divided into 45 short chapters which are laid out point-wise, the book is designed as a school text book. Each chapter has a section at the end with a set of questions regarding the facts given in it. Beginning with theories about the first European who may have “discovered” the North American c ...
 
The Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776. It announced that the thirteen American colonies, who were at war with Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War, no longer considered themselves part of the British Empire. They now called themselves a new nation, The United States of America. This famous document went on to become a well-known keystone of the human rights movement. However, the newly formed state had no real identity or philosophy and were merely a loose col ...
 
For American journalist and humorist Edgar Wilson Nye who wrote under the pen name Bill Nye in the late 19th century, facts are not to be presented in their newborn, bare state. They should be properly draped and embellished before they can be presented before the public. Hence, in the Comic History of the United States published in 1894, he gives his readers the facts. But in a bid to make the historical figures more human he describes them as “people who ate and possibly drank, people who ...
 
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show series
 
The series ends with a final test for the Jaguars at the city championship. After the final point has been scored, members of the team try to assess their success. And what about the success of the merger? Students and coaches look at how the integration played out across John Jay’s athletics program, and ask: was it all worth it? “Keeping Score” i…
 
We look at the Vice President who - maybe - described the office as a "bucket of warm spit." That's a bit more questionable than some accounts, even my own podcast, makes it out to be. (He never said it directly to any reporter). The sometimes supporter of the New Deal and sometimes not VP may have been its most powerful VP occupant up to his time.…
 
The Tennessee Civil Rights Trail podcast explores the most significant aspects of the Movement in the state. This episode takes a look at the integral role college students played in the city (from Fisk University, American Baptist College, Tennessee State University and elsewhere) especially as they participated in significant protests, such as th…
 
This week we’re in Utah discussing a self-professed prophet who started a cult with his brother called the School of Prophets. Then, we’ll talk about a teenager who left for school and was never seen again. Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Beehive State. You may now join us on Patreon or buy us a Cocktail. Be sure to …
 
Tenure of Office: June 12, 1800 - March 4, 1801 (as Secretary of War); January 1, 1801 - May 13, 1801 (as Secretary of the Treasury) Samuel Dexter may have come into the Cabinet towards the end of John Adams's tenure as president, but there was still a good bit for my special guest, Shawn from the American History Podcast, and myself to discuss abo…
 
And we're back again people this time we go down memory lane to go over one of the biggest trilogies of the modern-day in terms of Cinema the Lord of the Rings we go over the Fellowship of the Ring The Two Towers Return of the King as well as The Hobbit trilogy which is the prequel to The Original Trilogy and we pay tribute to a dear friend Sharlen…
 
Real Estate Investing Success Minneapolis with Author, CEO, Active Real Estate Investor Matt Jones Real Estate Investing Success Minneapolis is sponsored by MnREIA.com. Minnesota Real Estate Investors Association is the Largest REIA in the Upper Midwest and voted the #1 REIA in Minnesota by the Top Association Leaders and National Speakers in the c…
 
Plus, a reflection on the significance of LGBT Pride in a scary political time for the community. Host Kai Wright and listeners react to the recent SCOTUS decisions, including the fall of Roe v. Wade. Hear Dr. Sanithia Williams from Alabama Women’s Clinic, and her experience as a provider in one of the 13 states with trigger laws; Elie Mystal, just…
 
What does it mean to lead a team in an anti-racist way? After getting strong feedback from Mariah and other players, Coach Mike Salak decides to change his tactics. But as the girls volleyball practices lead into tournaments, it’s clear that who gets to play continues to be a divisive issue. “Keeping Score” is a co-production of WNYC Studios and Th…
 
On this national live call-in special: The history. The party. The food. Black Texans school us on the holiday they created. This Juneteenth, host Kai Wright is joined by Pulitzer-Prize winning historian and Harvard law professor, Annette Gordon-Reed, to break down the history behind the newest federal holiday, and help take calls from Black Texans…
 
The Tennessee Civil Rights Trail podcast explores the most significant aspects of the Movement in the state. This episode offers a sketch of the city’s overall history before bringing us into what it was like there in the 1950s and 1960s. We learn about the city’s Sanitation Workers’ Strike in 1968, the cause that compelled Martin Luther King, Jr. …
 
This week we’re in Georgia discussing a mass murder in a town known for celebrating Christmas year-round. Then, we’ll talk about the fatal story of a female sheriff's deputy and her bodybuilder boyfriend. Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Peach State. You may now join us on Patreon or buy us a Cocktail. Be sure to subs…
 
Mariah Morgan, a junior at Park Slope Collegiate and setter on the girls varsity volleyball team, was an early proponent of the merger – she helped lobby for it as a member of the Campus Council. But her optimism is tested when practice starts. To understand the building’s complicated history, she explores how Millennium came to be at John Jay in t…
 
Why We Can't (and Shouldn't) Move On From Jan. 6. Fordham University political science professor, Christina Greer, joins to takes our politics questions on the hearings and more. Plus, the story of 91-year-old artist Faith Ringgold, as told by her daughter. Companion listening for this episode: A Conservative View of the Vigilante Right (1/24/2022)…
 
The Tennessee Civil Rights Trail podcast explores the most significant aspects of the Movement in the state. The episodes will take you from the cities of Memphis and Nashville to the town of Clinton. And they will feature the voices of veteran foot soldiers who stood strong against oppression. You’ll also hear from historians and experts who expla…
 
This week we’re in North Dakota discussing a Halloween Murder mystery. Then, we’ll talk about a case involving battered woman syndrome. Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Peace Garden State. Everyone deserves relationships free from domestic violence. When you're ready, we're here to listen with confidential support 24/…
 
Content Note: This episode mentions the topic of suicide. Year(s) Discussed: 1807-1810 The Madison administration experienced numerous setbacks and embarrassments in the latter part of 1809. The President's private secretary, Isaac Coles, committed an egregious breach of privilege while on official business. Around the same time, Dolley Madison's b…
 
The John Jay Educational Campus, a large brick building in Park Slope, Brooklyn, houses four high schools: Cyberarts Studio Academy, the Secondary School for Law, Millennium Brooklyn, and Park Slope Collegiate. Each school is its own separate universe, but the students yearn to connect. When the administration announces that the athletics programs …
 
Schools Had a Tough Year. What’d We Learn? Plus, follow the season of a girl’s varsity volleyball team, and find one Brooklyn school building’s effort to bridge its stark racial divide. From WNYC’s new miniseries, Keeping Score. The past year has forced public classrooms into the center of our country’s intense culture wars and political debates, f…
 
This week we’re in Oklahoma and we will both be discussing the disappearance of the Jamison family. Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Sooner State. You may now join us on Patreon or buy us a Cocktail. Be sure to subscribe on Apple and leave a review, or, email us at unitedstatesofmurder@gmail.com Follow us on Facebook,…
 
Year(s) Discussed: 1812-2016 We often examine the lives and legacies of those select few who win the US presidential elections every four years, but what about their opponents? What might we learn from their unsuccessful campaigns as well as their overall careers? In this episode, I am joined by Peter Shea to discuss his book, In the Arena: A Histo…
 
And here we are again another mass shooting to within less than a month of each other this time one was in Buffalo New York the other wasn't Texas 10 elderly people killed in Buffalo 19 children in Texas killed I talked about it and other things as well as give my final thoughts and opinion as per the norm TuneIn and enjoy--- This episode is sponso…
 
After publishing 34 books, Alice Walker talks through her latest release, a collection of personal journals spanning four decades. Read more in Gathering Blossoms Under Fire: The Journals of Alice Walker, 1965–2000, out now. Companion listening for this episode: Lynn Nottage: Unexpected Optimist (1/3/2022) Playwright Lynn Nottage breaks down her re…
 
This week we’re in Michigan discussing the real-life killer that inspired the movie Jeepers Creepers. Then, we'll talk about a blood pact. Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Great Lakes State. You may now join us on Patreon or buy us a Cocktail. Be sure to subscribe on Apple and leave a review, or, email us at unitedsta…
 
There are no “lone wolves” in the terrorist violence of white identity politics. So what’s that mean for white people who want to confront it? First, assistant secretary for homeland security under President Obama and current professor at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, Juliette Kayyem, joins host Kai Wright to help us make sense of the mom…
 
This week we’re in Idaho discussing a case that detectives said looked like it was straight out of a horror film. Then, we’ll talk about the lengths some will go to for revenge. Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Gem State. You may now join us on Patreon or buy us a Cocktail. Be sure to subscribe on Apple and leave a re…
 
Tenure of Office: June 18, 1798 - March 31, 1801 A merchant and land speculator by trade, Benjamin Stoddert's path to becoming the first Secretary of the Navy was an unconventional one. However, did this unique background contribute to success while in office? With my special guest, Stacey Roberts of the History's Trainwrecks podcast, we explore th…
 
In this episode, “Meeting Places, Organizing Protests & Confrontations, pt. 2,” historians and experts help explain the role of the civil rights movement in Louisiana’s rural towns such as Plaquemine, Jonesboro and Bogalusa. You’ll hear the heroic stories of the Deacons of the Defense and learn about the influential 105-Mile March from Bogalusa all…
 
In this episode, “Meeting Places, Organizing Protests & Confrontations, pt. 1,” historians and experts help explain the growth of the non-violent protests that helped desegregate Louisiana. You’ll hear the story of the nation’s first bus boycott in Baton Rouge. And you’ll learn about the student-organized sit-ins and protests in New Orleans, Shreve…
 
In this episode, “Desegregation,” historians and experts help explain some of the most pioneering moments in desegregation in the state of Louisiana. You’ll learn about the key role that the 761st Tank Battalion at Camp Beauregard played during World War II. You’ll hear the story how a coach fought to integrate the basketball team at what is now kn…
 
The state of Louisiana plays a pivotal role in the history of the Civil Rights Movement. And the Louisiana Civil Rights Trail podcast tells the triumphant stories of people there who made a difference both in their communities and around the country. Each episode features historians, experts and eyewitnesses who explain the full context and help us…
 
An intergenerational meditation on Ntozake Shange’s iconic Broadway play, For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf. First, host Kai Wright and producer speak with the director and choreographer of the current Broadway Revival, Camille A. Brown. Then, performers Trazana Beverley, Aku Kadogo, and Carol Maillard reminisce…
 
This week we’re in Florida discussing a disappearance on the beach. Then, we’ll talk about Gibtown, Florida (also known as Gibsonton) which was a utopia for those who didn't quite fit in elsewhere. Gibtown is known as "America's Last Freakshow Town." Buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Sunshine State... and the circus. Y…
 
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