Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 2

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Episode 90:

This week we’re continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith

[Part 1]
Introduction

[Part 2 - This Week]
1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905 - 00:38
Autocracy and Orthodoxy - 21:23
Popular Religion - 33:17

[Part 3 - 4?]
1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905

[Part 5 - 7?]
2. From Reform to War, 1906–1917

[Part 8 - 10?]
3. From February to October 1917

[Part 11 - 14?]
4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power

[Part 15 - 17?]
5. War Communism

[Part 18 - 20?]
6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy

[Part 21 - 24?]
7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture

[Part 25?]
Conclusion

Figures:
1) Nicholas II, Alexandra, and their family. - 21:31
Footnotes:
1) 00:58
Orlando Figes, A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution, 1891–1924 (London: Jonathan Cape, 1996).

2) 05:08
V. O. Kliuchevsky, A History of Russia, vol. 1 (London: J. M. Dent, 1911), 2.

3) 07:13
D. C. B. Lieven, Towards the Flame: Empire, War and the End of Tsarist Russia (London: Allen Lane, 2015), 9.

4) 08:05
Cited in Paul Kennedy, Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (New York: Random House, 1987), 177.

5) 13:02
Lieven, Towards the Flame, 85.

6) 14:07
http://demoscope.ru/weekly/ssp/rus_lan_97.php

7) 14:38
Jane Burbank and Mark von Hagen (eds), Russian Empire: Space, People, Power, 1700–1930 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2007); John W. Slocum, ‘Who, and When, Were the Inorodtsy? The Evolution of the Category of “Aliens” in Imperial Russia’, Russian Review, 57:2 (1998), 173–90.

8) 15:05
Theodore Weeks, Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863–1914 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1996); Alexei Miller, ‘The Empire and Nation in the Imagination of Russian Nationalism’, in A. Miller and A. J. Rieber (eds), Imperial Rule (Budapest: Central European University Press, 2004), 9–22.

9) 15:37
Robert D. Crews, For Prophet and Tsar: Islam and Empire in Russia and Central Asia (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006).

10) 17:26
Paul Werth, At the Margins of Orthodoxy: Mission, Governance, and Confessional Politics in Russia’s Volga-Kama Region, 1827–1905 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2002).

11) 18:11
Alexander Morrison, Russian Rule in Samarkand, 1868–1910: A Comparison with British India (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008).

12) 18:38
Robert Geraci, Window on the East: National and Imperial Identities in Late-Imperial Russia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001).

13) 19:13
Charles Steinwedel, ‘To Make a Difference: The Category of Ethnicity in Late Imperial Russian Politics, 1861–1917’, in D. L. Hoffmann and Yanni Kotsonis (eds), Russian Modernity: Politics, Knowledge, Practices (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000), 67–86.

14) 19:49
Andreas Kappeler, The Russian Empire: A Multiethnic History (Harlow: Pearson, 2001); Willard Sunderland, ‘The Ministry of Asiatic Russia: The Colonial Office That Never Was But Might Have Been’, Slavic Review, 60:1 (2010), 120–50.

15) 20:04
Geoffrey Hosking, Russia: People and Empire (London: Fontana, 1998).

16) 21:19
Miller, ‘The Empire and Nation’, 9–22.

17) 21:48
Dominic Lieven, Nicholas II: Emperor of All the Russias (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989).

18) 22:25
http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/royalty/russia/rfl.html

19) 25:04
Abraham Ascher, The Revolution of 1905, vol. 2: Authority Restored (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1992), 222.

20) 25:09
Richard Pipes, Russia under the Old Regime (New York: Penguin, 1977).

21) 26:36
Peter Waldron, ‘States of Emergency: Autocracy and Extraordinary Legislation, 1881–1917’, Revolutionary Russia, 8:1 (1995), 1–25.

22) 26:56
Waldron, ‘States of Emergency’, 24.

23) 27:26
Neil Weissman, ‘Regular Police in Tsarist Russia, 1900–1914’, Russian Review, 44:1 (1985), 45–68 ( 49).

24) 27:47
Jonathan W. Daly, The Watchful State: Security Police and Opposition in Russia, 1906–1917 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2004), 5–6. Daly, incidentally, gives a higher figure—100,000—than Weissman for the number of police of all kinds in 1900.

25) 28:14
Figes, People’s Tragedy, 46.

26) 28:50
T. Emmons and W. S. Vucinich (eds), The Zemstvo in Russia: An Experiment in Local Self-Government (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 215.

27) 30:25
Hans Rogger, Russia in the Age of Modernisation and Revolution, 1881–1917 (London: Longman, 1983), 72.

28) 31:18
J. S. Curtiss, The Russian Church and the Soviet State (Boston: Little, Brown, 1953), 10.

29) 32:09
Gregory L. Freeze, ‘Handmaiden of the State? The Orthodox Church in Imperial Russia Reconsidered’, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 36 (1985), 82–102.

30) 32:46
Simon Dixon, ‘The Orthodox Church and the Workers of St Petersburg, 1880–1914’, in Hugh McLeod, European Religion in the Age of Great Cities, 1830–1930 (London: Routledge, 1995), 119–41.

31) 33:49
Vera Shevzov, Russian Orthodoxy on the Eve of Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).

32) 35:23
A. K. Baiburin, ‘Poliarnosti v rituale (tverdoe i miagkoe)’, Poliarnost’ v kul’ture: Almanakh ‘Kanun’ 2 (1996), 157–65.

33) 36:28
Vera Shevzov, ‘Chapels and the Ecclesial World of Pre-revolutionary Peasants’, Slavic Review, 55:3 (1996), 585–613.

34) 37:00
Chris J. Chulos, Converging Worlds: Religion and Community in Peasant Russia, 1861–1917 (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2003), 159.

35) 37:59
J. S. Curtiss, Church and State in Russia: the Last Years of the Empire, (New York: Columbia University Press, 1965), 118.

36) 38:46
David G. Rowley, ‘ “Redeemer Empire”: Russian Millenarianism’, American Historical Review, 104 (1999), 1582–602.

37) 39:18
James H. Billington, The Icon and the Axe: An Interpretive History of Russian Culture (New York: Vintage Books, 1970), 514.

38) 40:18
Nadieszda Kizenko, A Prodigal Saint: Father John Kronstadt and the Russian People (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000), 271.

39) 40:34
Sergei Fomin (comp.), Rossiia pered vtorym prishestviem: prorochestva russkikh sviatykh (Moscow: Sviato-Troitskaia Sergieva Lavra, 1993). This is a compendium of prophecies of doom about the fate of Russia by saints, monks, nuns, priests, theologians, and a sprinking of lay writers, including Dostoevsky, V. V. Rozanov, and Lev Tikhomirov.

96 episode